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GPS MOUNT
to make my 1450 flat black, I sanded the silver finish off of the frame with 600 paper wet

By Chet Walters
Click for Rattlebars Mfg.
Click for Chet's Wing Pages


NOTE THE SINCE THIS PAGE MAY BE ADDED TO
MANY TIMES, LOOK IN TEXT FOR THE PARTS NEEDED
AND SUBSTITUTE AS DESIRED
MATERIALS
Ram mount for your GPS
steel or aluminum to size
#12 x 1" bolts with nuts (2)
3m to make 1.5 inch square
velcro loop to make 1" square
5/16" box wrench
TOOLS
5/16 box wrench
drill with step bits
6" Swivel Pad Lock-Grip Pliers
alcohol pads
Click any picture to see enlargement
for printing or viewing
Use backspace key to return
For steps not described fully - use your head.
PREPARE YOUR ROUGH CUTS
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
With the dimensions shown in the pic, make your rough cuts and apply your finish. I had my lower powder coated to make sure that all the adhesives stuck well but I was doing other parts so it might be cost prohibitive. You can use Duplicolor Truck bed liner which is what I used to touch up the nuts and washers. It matched my "Night Train" textured black perfectly.

Drill the lower large bracket with 3/8" holes 2 inches apart in the center 3/4" down from the top. Bend, but DO NOT drill the smaller upper bracket. We are going to mark that with both pieces in place in case you drilled slightly off on the large bottom bracket. On the small top piece make a slight bend in the center of the long part so that it will conform to the curve of the visor.

You may need to adjust the bend angles and dimensions to suit your needs, but the outlines on the picture to the left seem to work well for my Garmin 1450. If you have a vent, bend some cardboard to fashion test brackets to see if you can make this work. I don't have a vent.

THIS IS MUCH EASIER TO DO WITH THE WINDSHIELD OFF!
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
Once you are ready to install, do a dry run first. Protect your visor with duct tape and leave the red protective tape on the 3M & put your pieces in place. Leave about 1/4" space between the bottom bracket upright and the visor edge. Use the vice grips to clamp it. See if it all fits for you. If so, take the red protector off of the 3M on the large bottom bracket and affix the bracket in place stuck to the underside of the visor (remember to first remove the duct tape and clean with alcohol the mating surface). Then, without your top pad affixed to it, put the top bracket in place and clamp with the grips. Mark the holes as viewed from the bike's seat through the holes on the bottom bracket onto the top bracket. Remove, center punch and drill 3/8" holes in the top bracket. We left off the "pad" so that when you clamp and tighten to finalize, it will be nice n' tight. Affix your pad to the top bracket, pull the duct tape off the visor and set the bracket in place. Start the bolts through the assembly ...
WE SEE HOW THE SCREWS GO THROUGH THE RAM
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
...and loosely tighten the bolts through the RAM mount (trim the bolts shorter if necessary). Center everything up and clamp tightly with the vice grips again. As you tighten the bolts, adjust the brackets as needed to keep everything lined up. Your GPS is now ready to drop in the RAM mount. If you have done this properly, you should have a good solid mount for your GPS which can be subsequently removed without damage to your visor (use the fishing line method to cut the 3M and Ronsonol to get the residue off). You also now have a bracket in place to use with any future GPS, you will just need to get the RAM cradle to fit the new one.

 

FINISH UP BY TOUCHING UP
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
Here is a good view of the finished product. The picture at the right is the rider's view so you can see how nothing on this mount covers any of the gauges on the display. Note that I got a right angle power supply @  eBay for just a few dollars for the Garmin because I wanted it to exit on the side to be completely hidden. The plug that came with it was right angled and down. It is plugged in under the left pocket using a female lighter socket. I painted the bolts to match the powder coat using Duplicolor Black Truck Bed Liner. To touch up with a brush, just spray some into a cup and dab on. It blends well as you can see. I first mounted this using just the sticky tape on the bottom bracket but it was the dead of winter and I could not test it. That first mount was done with the windshield off. Once I could test it, it was rather noisy clicking at each bump. I added the top bracket to steady it and it's entirely solid and noise free. I fashioned the top bracket and installed it with the windshield in place. If you have a vent, this might be problematic.

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Secret way to make your nüvi  record tracks like a Zumo
click on pics for larger view

This is how you access the secret track recording of the nüvi . It's NOT the trip log which records every 15 seconds or so and is inaccurate. This records only the location every second and makes for a very tight log of your travels. You can then load the track into BaseCamp or MapSource and trace the important roads with the route tools along the track. Track size limit is what the memory can handle.

So, HOW do we do it?? First, tap the speed on the map screen. On the next screen, press and hold the center of the speedometer for about 6 seconds.
The Diagnostics Page will appear on which you should tap Diagnostic Logging. On the next Engineering Mode screen tap Start Recording. If you have already saved some logs, you can delete from the nüvi  by tapping the Delete Log(s) text.   
  On the Select Data to Log screen check GPX so we can use the track log later. After you tap Start, you will be back at the map screen and under "Ready to Navigate" (or whatever may appear in the top bar), there will be an extra semi-transparent button with Stop in it. When you are all done recording or you want to start a new recording, tap that button.  
  Once we have our track recorded, what can we do with it? We can load it into MapSource or BaseCamp. We will look here at BaseCamp on Windows 8.1 but the method is the same for loading both mapping programs and across platforms. First one must have "hidden files" showing in Explorer. The tracks are in a system hidden folder named ".system" on your nüvi internal memory so plug in your nüvi  with the USB cable and open Explorer. Below we see how to navigate the directory tree to get to our track GPX files. The files are named by the day they were recorded. Open the one you want with BaseCamp and the result will look something like picture 2 below (I only went around a rather large block for illustration purposes). How log a trip can you record? Probably 24 or more hours. This logging consumes roughly .33 MB per hour. This "mode" survives power down and starts a new GPX file after power down.  It will stay in this tracking mode until you tap the "Stop" on the map below the top bar after which you will go back to the "Start Recording and Delete logs" menu. Creating a route from one of these tracks is as easy as tracing. In both Basecamp and MapSource it is necessary to draw a route by following the track with the route tool. Now you have the ability to create detailed routes with your nüvi just like those who have spent hundreds more on a Zumo! 

What's the advantage of doing it this way vs the easily accessed trip log data that the nuvi records anyway. The most notable feature is that this way facilitates data organization. There is only one or two files to sift through to find the record. In trip log, there are typically several to several hundred files to sift through and your trip might be split between more than one log. Recording every second this record is much more accurate than the trip log data which records in 15 second intervals and sometimes shows wild detours.
 

Here's how to display hidden files and folders.

  1. Open Folder Options by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Appearance and Personalization, and then clicking Folder Options. or find folder options in a drive window.

  2. Click the View tab.

  3. Under Advanced settings, click Show hidden files, folders, and drives, and then click OK.

To learn more about hidden files, see What is a hidden file?

 


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The information on these pages is accurate to the best of the author's knowledge. The author can assume no responsibility for the use or misuse of this information by the reader. The reader is expected to secure any other information needed from Service Manuals or other sources. It is up to the reader to determine his/her ability to make any modifications noted. If the reader does not feel qualified he/she should enlist professional help.


CAMERA MOUNT
These new cameras are just a few ounces so you can mount them almost anywhere cheaply

Slot filed in holder for easy card R&R
sjcam_filed.jpeg

By Chet Walters
Click for Rattlebars Mfg.
Click for Chet's Wing Pages
 


NOTE THE SINCE THIS PAGE MAY BE ADDED TO
MANY TIMES, LOOK IN TEXT FOR THE PARTS NEEDED
AND SUBSTITUTE AS DESIRED
MATERIALS
paracord
suction mount
SJ4000 or GoPro

 

TOOLS
5/16 box wrench
drill with step bits
6" Swivel Pad Lock-Grip Pliers
alcohol pads
Click any picture to see enlargement
for printing or viewing
Use backspace key to return
For steps not described fully - use your head.
  SO LIGHT THEY CAN GO ANYWHERE
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
This idea came from Denny modified by yours truly. With a simple suction mount and a small 1 foot length of cord, you can achieve professional results with these cameras that weigh just ounces. There's not much beyond that. Tie your cord around the camera mount and on the other end tie a good double knob knot. Affix your suction cup mounted camera to the shield about six inches in from either side. Lift the levers to release the garnish from the shield as if you were going to raise it and pull the top out enough to drop your knot behind the garnish. Snap the levers back down and you are ready to roll! Removal is the reverse of installation.

For power or another tether, if you have a vent you can run your power and tether out the vent. Else, a power cord around the shield will do nicely.

CAPTURE AND EDIT YOUR MASTERPIECE
Click here for scrollable printable pic.
I use Power Director for editing video. It has a stabilization tool that essentially zooms your video a bit then takes the shakes out. This not only takes out the bumps, it also serves to ameliorate the fish eye effect (bent edges). You can completely eliminate the fish eye by actually using the zoom tool which will net you a view of the footage as if it were shot with a 5mm 80° lens instead of the 170° that most of these light weight cameras come with.  At left you can see the results. It's a two minute video demonstrating the stabilization tool. YouTube can do the same thing, but if you can't redownload.....  


 

 

     
 

Help keep this website alive. Donate what you will or simply click an ad on this page for free.


The information on these pages is accurate to the best of the author's knowledge. The author can assume no responsibility for the use or misuse of this information by the reader. The reader is expected to secure any other information needed from Service Manuals or other sources. It is up to the reader to determine his/her ability to make any modifications noted. If the reader does not feel qualified he/she should enlist professional help.